December 2, 2013

7 Web development apps for your tablet

Hackers-Keyboard-Android
Hacker’s Keyboard for Google Play.

When does a tablet beat a PC? When it’s more convenient

Target audience: Web developers, Web publishers, content creators, marketing professionals, SEO specialists, PR pros, brand managers, businesses, nonprofits, educators.

Guest post by Teddy Hunt

teddy-huntWhen you have a website, sometimes you’ll get the urge to add or change something in the middle of the night. Rather than waking up and walking across your place to the PC, you choose to roll over and grab your tablet.

The only problem, though, is that browsers for tablets are pretty clunky for developers, publishers and content creators, and there’s no real easy way to do what you need to do. Here are a few Web development apps that can give you a hand.

View Web Source

1Sometimes you may need to make a minor change to your code. For these instances, a tablet isn’t ideal at all — unless you have the View Web Source app at your fingertips. As the name suggests, this app allows you to view the web source code on your webpage — through your mobile device. The app makes the text come across extremely clear and very readable. You’ll be able to copy the source code to the clipboard and paste it elsewhere, whether you want to store it on the device itself or email it to yourself with notes on what to change later. See the Web Source Viewer app for Apple’s iOS or the View Web Source app for Google Play. Continue reading

July 16, 2013

Which blog platform is best for your business?

blogs

Choices include Tumblr, SquareSpace, Weebly, LiveJournal (oh, and WordPress)

Guest post by Andrew Lisa

Andrew-LisaThe question I probably get asked the most is, “If I’m already on Twitter and Facebook, do I still need to blog?” It’s a trick question.

If you’re using Twitter and Facebook — or Pinterest or whatever else — you are blogging. They can call it social media or microblogging or whatever they want, but if you’re updating a personal page with text, photos, videos, or some combination of all of them, you’re already blogging.

For those of us who want to break the mold, get out on our own, and leave the constraints and privacy concerns of social media behind, follow this guide for determining which of the seemingly endless blog sites is best for you or your business. Continue reading

January 22, 2013

How to go from student to master of your domain


George Harrison, Stuart Sutcliffe and John Lennon of the Beatles, circa 1960.

Want to be a social media pro? Learn by doing

Target audience: Businesses, brands, marketing professionals, geeks, general public.

Chris AbrahamWhile Malcolm Gladwell suggested in his book Outliers: The Story of Success that you need to engage in a challenging 10,000 hours of experience and practice before becoming a master, don’t let that theory overwhelm you. The belief that you need to accrue all 10,000 hours of practice and experience before you sell yourself as a social media maven isn’t necessarily accurate.

All you need to do is know more than the person who hires you to become a professional. It is in taking the risk upon yourself to fake it till you make it, to make mistakes while you’re making magic, and in learning and knowing more so that you can win clients who are smarter and more sophisticated. Continue reading

December 17, 2012

Turn your website into your social media brand HQ


Image by elycefeliz on Flickr

Make your website your communications hub

Target audience: Businesses, brands, developers, marketing professionals, SEO specialists, geeks, general public.

Chris AbrahamAt the end of the day, none of us owns anything we do on Facebook, Twitter, PinterestGoogle Plus. What we do own is our personal properties.

No matter how many hours I spend at the Java Shack or Peregrine Espresso, I am just a customer. Social media and its social networks may feel like a home to some of us, but they’re really just private public spaces, similar to coffee shops, the Politics & Prose reading area, or the ballroom at the Rosslyn Marriott. Continue reading

December 14, 2011

Social media success demands talent above technology

http://a1.mzstatic.com/us/r1000/033/Purple/93/9a/4a/mzl.jyuhnpck.175x175-75.jpgChris AbrahamIn response to The Social Media News Release explained in detail, Jonathan Rick asked me, “Isn’t this essentially the same thing that Pitch Engine offers?” Jason Kintzler then added, “Yes Jonathan, exactly! Did I mention you can do it all for free?!” (See Socialmedia.biz’s earlier writeup on PitchEngine: A social PR platform for the new era.)

Well, my response is the topic of this post today: “The article is only about the what and why of the Social Media News Release and not the how. Pitch Engine is a how!” I then added, “Pitch Engine doesn’t take away the work: writing/collecting compelling copy and assets. You do that work” and then “Our SMNR is just a platform and structure. 90% of one’s time should be spent writing amazing content” and then, finally, “Installing WordPress, an amazing platform, does not an amazing blog make; Pitch Engine is amazing but content is king.”

Continue reading

November 9, 2011

Max SEO with 8 simple Google+ steps

Chris AbrahamLet me boil my last post, Here’s why it make sense to use Google Plus, down to practical pieces. Part of what makes a technology premature is that you have to be careful how you use it, because it isn’t mature enough to just work no matter what you do with it. To help you carefully handle Google+ for maximum advantage, I’ve assembled eight steps that help you get the best search visibility from your Google+ posts. These tips are simple, but some are easy to overlook. I hacked this awful-looking graphic as an example:

Optimizing Google+ for optimal SEO

Here’s a list of things that you need to consider before you invest your time and energy in Google+:

  • Make sure all your posts are Public. You can add more circles in order to spur interest among your friends, but be sure you explicitly tell Google, through your willingness to share publicly, that they can index your content in their public search engine. Check this every time because sometimes Public isn’t always selected, depending on the situation. Here’s my Google+ public profile.
  • Use a clean URL when you add your content to Google+. Google+ hasn’t been translating URL shorteners well, so use a link from the source. This will not only allow Google to better populate the content as you see above, including the Title, Blog Name, Description, and an Image from the post, but it will also allow that content to be cross-referenced to any Google +1 “likes” from others within Google+ and the rest of the Googlephere. Site URLs are translated the way they are on Facebook. You need to paste the URL into the “Share what’s new…” text box.
  • Prefixing names with a plus sign links that name to the person’s profile on Google+. You can include your friends and people you’re connected to on G+ in a similar way you do in Facebook, but Google+ has a gimmick that you may know or not. In the graphic above, you’ll see a light gray-blue rectangular box around the names Arsh S and Jenna Levy — I did that by adding a plus symbol (+) before each name while I am writing the article. G+ then populates a pull-down, offering pre-populated names of people I am connected to. I just need to select and go. Sometimes the profile’s privacy setting prohibits the link reference to persist after posting. Linking to people is a good way to engage, inform, and initiate conversation.

Continue reading