January 23, 2014

What the first ever Google Glass-powered interview says about the future of tech

Ayelet NoffThe most exciting aspect about tech, for me at least, is the exponential nature of technological change. We can see this in the big tech changes of the past 100 years. A century ago, the big technological change came from the invention of cars and planes, 70 years ago it was TV, 40 years ago the personal computer. Now, the pace of technological change is so fast that major new inventions are unveiled practically every day.

Donning Google’s cutting-edge wearable headset to film both participants’ eye-level views of a tech conversation

In fact, just a few days ago I was able to take part in a first-of-its-kind technological experiment. My good friend Enon Landenberg, the CEO of Infinity AR, invited me to participate in the first-ever Glass-to-Glass interview. The idea was that we would don Google’s cutting-edge wearable headset and use it to film both of our eye-level views of a tech conversation.

Continue reading

October 30, 2013

How to use Vine for video marketing

vine

9 tips on how to put short-term video to work for your business

Target audience: Marketing professionals, PR pros, brand managers, businesses, nonprofits, video producers, educators, Web publishers, journalists.

Andrew-LisaVine is a powerful video platform based on the concept of Twitter and brought to you by the people who invented the term micro-blogging. Like Twitter, it isn’t just for entertainment, and marketers and advertisers quickly realized the power of the app that decided six seconds is all a good video really needs.

Follow this guide of do’s and don’ts to making sure your Vine video sings for your business, nonprofit or organization.

Do display your brand

1In the quest to tell a story in a seemingly impossible amount of time, it is so easy to forget that your brand logo or image should be visible somewhere in the Vine video for all six seconds (or most of them). Continue reading

November 12, 2010

How do you get everyone to watch your video?

Advice that’s good, bad and one suggestion that’s almost impossible to achieve

David SparkI’m at Streaming Media West this week in Los Angeles covering the event for Ignite Technologies, a content delivery network for distribution of video within the enterprise. For more of Ignite’s coverage from Streaming Media West, check out Ignite’s blog.

While taking a boat cruise during the Streaming Media West conference in Los Angeles, I asked the invited guests what they would do if they really wanted everyone to watch their video. Some of them had good advice and some had advice that would be rather difficult to achieve. Watch.

Thanks to Microsoft and Kaltura for hosting the cruise.

UPDATE (11/15/10)
: Results from this post. Read article “Here’s what’s wrong with social media: Sharing without consumption.”

November 5, 2009

Highlights from ad:tech New York 2009


David SparkI just finished up my second day of reporting at ad:tech in New York for ad:tech, a conference about the digital side of the advertising industry. The event happens ten times a year all over the world and I last reported on the event for ad:tech in San Francisco.

At this year’s New York conference I saw many of the same things I’ve seen at ad:tech over the years, and that’s ad networks. I believe they’ve been there since day one of this conference and they’re never going away. They’re the bread and butter of the business.

I was more interested in what’s trending and at this show I saw a really big push towards businesses generating revenue from content. Advertisers are slowly realizing they need to be media companies as well, but not wholly. In fact, there’s a symbiotic relationship between paid advertising and earned media.

Watch the day 2 show report and the day 1 show report for an overview of some of the stuff I saw. Almost everything I mention in the show report videos you’ll find in a subsequent video below. There’s a total of 30 videos.

While I do a lot of live event reporting, understand that ad:tech is a very big conference and there’s no way to feasibly see it all, so these show reports should be titled, “What David got a chance to get around to see in his two days at ad:tech.”

Continue reading

August 1, 2009

Is the Internet making us more ethical?

Ethics of cultural collaboration from JD Lasica on Vimeo.

JD LasicaRita J. King, a senior fellow at the Carnegie Council and CEO of Dancing Ink Productions, talks about the ethics of cultural collaboration in this 10-minute video interview immediately after her appearance at the 140 Character Conference on Twitter in New York on June 17.

twitter-greenOur conversation was generally at a 50,000-foot level, looking at the Internet and its role in the development of an ethical culture. Rita uses the model of a Johari window, a square divided into four parts: How I see myself accurately; how I see myself inaccurately; how others see me accurately; and how others see me inaccurately. Participating in the digital culture shakes all those things up, she says, and new technologies are enabling people are able to parse out how they feel about the rituals and traditions that have been passed down from generation to generation “which both illuminate the human spirit and shackle us to outdated systems.”

During the panel and in our conversation, Rita questioned whether the efforts in the West to help the street demonstrators are helping or hurting if the tactics are based on deception, such as changing one’s Twitter profile to say you live in Tehran as an expression of solidarity. “Is it putting people on the ground in Tehran in jeopardy if they can’t find each other? Deliberate deception seems like a step backward to me. … And that’s symptomatic of other things that will continue to manifest in the digital culture,” with a debate over how best to achieve a social good.

Continue reading

July 15, 2009

BT’s CEO greets the Traveling Geeks

BT’s CEO greets the Traveling Geeks from JD Lasica on Vimeo.

JD LasicaHere’s a 3-minute video of BT (British Telecom) CEO Ian Livingston I took prior to the gala dinner party BT held for the Traveling Geeks atop the BT Tower in central London.

BT Group plc
Image via Wikipedia

What’s interesting is not the gracious greeting he gave to the Geeks, but the way in which he described the the culture of Great Britain’s largest telco. He said BT doesn’t start from the premise “that every innovation comes from our labs. It was probably never true, and now definitely isn’t true.” He discusses BT’s propensity “to be open and inclusive, and to try to bring the best from all the world, because we are only a small island here.”

During the dinner that followed, we individually heard about the company’s efforts to extend its open source mobile platform and other efforts that BT is working on.

You’ll hear a couple of questions from uber-blogger Robert Scoble in the video. This was my second video done with a Flip Ultra.

Related

JD Lasica: The future of television: Social TV

Howard Rheingold: Will BT let JP create the first open network operator? One scenario for the mobile Web

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]