November 19, 2009

Using Twitter Lists to manage your reputation

How to use Lists to monitor your personal & professional brands

Joanna LordThere’s been a lot of talk about Twitter Lists. How do you use them? How can they be improved? What is Twitter hoping to do with them … down the road? Not to mention the many posts on how pointless or awesome they are. Gotta love the Twitter buzz.

Well, I’m going to take a step back and focus on an actual use I’ve found for the new addition to our Twitter bag-of-tricks. Over the past few weeks I’ve started using the lists function in my online reputation management (ORM) endeavors. For those of you not that familiar with ORM and its many awesome faces, let me share with you a few things. Continue reading

November 2, 2009

10 ways to improve Twitter lists

Twitter Lists

The brilliance of Twitter lists and suggestions for making them more powerful

Ayelet NoffIn my opinion Twitter is the best tool we have today to engage with others, spread a message, network, meet other likeminded people, and stay on top of the news, in any industry. The only aspect I’ve always found problematic on Twitter was the impossibility of organizing information. This is something that’s changed now with the new Twitter lists, which allow you to organize people in any sort of list you like.

So how have you been using lists? What sort of names have you been giving your lists? It’s quite interesting to see what lists people have put you under and how you have been “categorized.”  With Twitter lists, I can put people I am following into specific categories. So for example, I have created lists of “bloggers,” “social media,” “brands,” etc.

“It takes an individual an hour to build a 200-person Twitter List in comparison to the days / weeks it takes to attain a 200-fan FB page. This will make Twitter Lists the prolific standard for organizing the social graph.”
— Patrick Kitano

Twitter lists are going to change the way we network and socialize. No longer are we going to have a list of journalists’ emails to send a press release to but rather we’ll have a Twitter list of all these journalists with their Twitter handles. Patrick Kitano writes in his post titled Twitter Lists will Organize the social graph: “It takes an individual an hour to build a 200-person Twitter List in comparison to the days / weeks it takes to attain a 200-fan FB page. This will make Twitter Lists the prolific standard for organizing the social graph.”

Each of us is organizing his/her own “following,” or rather social graph — basically  helping twitter organize its database for them. These lists will become invaluable to us both professionally and socially. However, please note that one Twitter account can create only 20 lists and each list can only contain 500 members, so choose your lists carefully and who’s in them even more carefully. Robert Scoble wrote  an excellent post describing the limitations, bugs, impact and brilliance of Twitter lists. Continue reading