October 10, 2013

How social media has changed TV advertising

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Image by Geico Insurance

Ad campaigns now often feature ‘second screen’ integration

Target audience: Marketing professionals, SEO specialists, social media managers, businesses, brands, Facebook administrators.

Guest post by Joseph Stark

joseph-starkSocial media didn’t just explode onto the scene over the past six years or so. In fact, it has been steadily gaining steam and heating up for the past two decades. Social networking options like SixDegrees.com and AOL Instant Messenger have been around since personal Internet access became a widespread concept in the early to mid-1990s. It’s a new development, however, that marketing campaigns are focusing their efforts on social media and capitalizing on it in a big way.

Watching television isn’t simply a matter of watching television anymore, and advertisers are taking note. People used to interact with TV through water cooler conversations about football games and plot twists, but the market has become increasingly segmented, and advertisers are now aiming to engage consumers through their viewing patterns — and social media habits. Continue reading

September 25, 2013

Book review: ‘Age of Context’ captures the pulse of new tech

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Robert Scoble, co-author of “The Age of Context,” wearing Google Glass at the 2013 Startup Conference (Photo by JD Lasica).

New book, out today, identifies ‘five forces’ animating modern culture

JD LasicaEvery few years someone comes along and pulls the camera back to reveal a wider view of the technological changes coursing through the business world and larger culture. Robert Scoble and Shel Israel have done just that with their new book, “The Age of Context: Mobile, Sensors, Data and the Future of Privacy” (paperback, self-published).

The authors nicely contextualize what they call the “five forces” in what amounts to a technology megatrend: mobile, sensor devices, social media, big data and location-based technologies. These forces add up to a formidable package, one that deserves scrutiny far beyond the boundaries of greater Silicon Valley, where much of the action takes place.

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The book goes on sale today on Amazon (though Amazon lists its release date as Sept. 5).

Scoble and Israel (both friends) convey their thesis – generally about the public good that will be served by the new contextual technologies, accompanied by the occasional caveat or warning – by stringing together short anecdotes about how people are adopting and adapting to this quickly emerging landscape.

Throughout the book, the authors raise provocative questions about how society should navigates an era of pervasive data: Who owns data being collected on individuals? How are the rules of privacy being reshaped, and who gets a say?

As someone who is immersed in Silicon Valley culture, I found myself nodding along more often than not, bemused by some of the bouts of optimistic boosterism and skeptical of some of the more grand claims. But that’s precisely why “The Age of Context” works: It raises the right questions and takes square aim at many of our cherished beliefs. We all have opinions about the effects that these transformations are casting on society, and you’ll have your own chance to cheer or jeer at the conclusions the authors draw. Continue reading

September 18, 2013

Are you surfing the social media wave?

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Photo by JD Lasica

Hang ten and ride that wave for years to come

Target audience: Marketing professionals, entrepreneurs, PR professionals, businesses, social media specialists.

Chris AbrahamSocial media marketing and digital PR consultants spend too much time paddling and not enough time surfing. Let me explain. It’s my opinion that social media and digital marketing strategists spend so much time paddling ahead of the breaking wave that they never benefit from the ride. Put in simple terms: None of the consulting money, jobs, or gigs live too far along the bleeding edge. I was selling search engine optimization 10 years ago but SEO only became legit and de rigueur 18 months ago.

I was selling online reputation management back in 2005 but ORM really only became an essential crisis strategy a few years ago. I was so far ahead of the wave that by the time the wave came around, I was exhausted from paddling! Continue reading

June 17, 2013

Learn to lower your social media inhibitions

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Gain support by letting people know the real you

This is the first of a two-part series.
Chris AbrahamHow much transparency have you shown today?

I bet you’re wondering why I am constantly begging you to stop being a nice guy, daydreamer, or introvert when it comes to being online and to put yourself out there. Well, it’s because I am trying to help you break down your inhibitions. I want you to be more willing to treat your social media followers the way they deserve: at the very least like allies, fans, and acquaintances; and, hopefully, like the friends they are or will become.

I know my methods are unconventional, but you really need a push. A chum of mine who will go unnamed picks at me on Facebook because I am getting to him.  He’s conflicted! He is fighting me, however, he doth protest too much. He really wants to enjoy a fair world: a world where someone who is as completely over-the-top talented at what he does should rightfully attract the sort of social and financial rewards that he fully and rightfully deserves.

Why be so shameless? Why expose yourself? I mean, celebrities and stars and whatnot don’t need to do that, do they? Right? Wrong. Everyone reveals themselves painfully one way or another, be it in a role in a movie, lyrics delivered with passion in a pop ballad, opening a vein in the pages of a novel; and, what’s more, all of these adored people who are “easily” and “naturally” followed, aren’t. Continue reading

April 25, 2013

In praise of social media perseverence

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With social marketing, showing up is half the battle

Chris AbrahamMy advice for blogging and social media marketing alike is as follows: 20 minutes a day — and one hour once a week. If you spend any less time than that, you’re really not a content marketer. However, spending this amount of time on social media brand promotion and protection is really just barely enough time to keep things moving forward.

It’s yeoman’s work and you’ll never win any awards for doing the bare minimum, but if you can keep showing up every work day and then spend an extra hour once a week, and you can do that persistently and consistently over time, you’ll start seeing some impressive results.

Social media rewards consistency, persistence, and attention, even if it isn’t super-service or if you take a full 24 hours to respond to a customer’s query or constituent’s concern.

Come on, you’re not @AmericanAir, and you don’t need to be. My flight was grounded en route to SXSW, I tweeted complaint, and AA got back to me on Twitter by the time I deplaned — you probably don’t need to offer that much service, do you? Continue reading