December 1, 2016

The more the messier for search success

redbullhorn Chris AbrahamYou need to spend only 20% of the time you do on your content marketing and marketing SEO than you’re doing — at least for now. Be quick, be messy, be pedestrian, maybe even turn off your Grammatik and your Autocorrect. Churn out five-times the amount of content you’ve been writing then hit publish and walk away for a couple days. Then, feel free to get all anal retentive on your content — but only with the stuff you plan to add to your portfolio. Leave everything else as close to as-is as possible. Please.

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December 4, 2013

SEO? Start by adding value to your website

books

Quenching Google’s informational thirst will pay off for your business

Target audience: Marketing professionals, SEO specialists, PR pros, brand managers, businesses, nonprofits, educators, Web publishers, journalists.

Chris AbrahamImet my buddy Adam Viener for breakfast the other morning at the Silver Diner in Reston, Va. This is something we do seasonally. Adam is an AdWords guru, par excellence, by profession; however, he also stays on top of organic search religiously just as part of creating content sublime enough to compel all the folks who click through from sponsored search, contextual ads, and display ads.

I asked him what he thought of Hummingbird, Google’s latest search algorithm, and he said: “Aside from just making sure you have all of the share and +1 buttons sorted out on your sites and committing to Google Authorship, the only thing that’s left is simple: creating content that gives value to Google.” Continue reading

November 12, 2013

Google Hummingbird tries to remove the masks

masked-character
Image by Frank Kovalchek on Flickr

This is the second of a two-part series on Google Hummingbird. Also see:
Google demands your papers with Hummingbird

Target audience: Marketing professionals, SEO specialists, PR pros, brand managers, businesses, educators, Web publishers, journalists.

Chris AbrahamIam back in the dating pool and have really enjoyed hearing everyone’s war stories. They’re, of course, first-world-problems; and, most of them feel like they’re torn directly from romcoms and sitcoms: “he was a decade older than his photo” and “he looked nothing like his photo” or “he was nothing like the way he described himself,” and “I really felt like I was bait-and-switched” and even, “if he thought he could lure me here under false pretenses and then make it all good on charm and personality, it didn’t work: he was charmless and lacked personality.”

Google feels the same way.

But because Google was built by an army of earnest, hopeful, and lonely nerds, it has taken over five years for Google to get a clue. Continue reading

June 18, 2012

Keep blogging even after you fracking hate it

http://goinglikesixty.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/10/i-have-nothing-to-say.gifChris AbrahamThere’s no reason to ever let your blog go fallow. Unlike leaving farmland unsown for a period in order to restore its fertility as part of a crop rotation, there’s no benefit in ignoring your blog. To be honest, it really doesn’t matter what you do to keep your blog running on a daily basis, but it’s essential that you don’t allow your blog to be categorized as “archived” by search engines, to say nothing of being forgotten by your readers. First, I will address why keeping your blog updated is essential to search engines and how fickle Google is. Google is worse than a Harvard Dean when it comes to judging you. “What have you done lately” is the name of the game and it is better for your career as a blogger to write filler during those times you’re not in the blogging mood: you’re having a crisis of faith, distracted by something else, or time-crushed by a well-paying job, for example.

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November 9, 2011

Max SEO with 8 simple Google+ steps

Chris AbrahamLet me boil my last post, Here’s why it make sense to use Google Plus, down to practical pieces. Part of what makes a technology premature is that you have to be careful how you use it, because it isn’t mature enough to just work no matter what you do with it. To help you carefully handle Google+ for maximum advantage, I’ve assembled eight steps that help you get the best search visibility from your Google+ posts. These tips are simple, but some are easy to overlook. I hacked this awful-looking graphic as an example:

Optimizing Google+ for optimal SEO

Here’s a list of things that you need to consider before you invest your time and energy in Google+:

  • Make sure all your posts are Public. You can add more circles in order to spur interest among your friends, but be sure you explicitly tell Google, through your willingness to share publicly, that they can index your content in their public search engine. Check this every time because sometimes Public isn’t always selected, depending on the situation. Here’s my Google+ public profile.
  • Use a clean URL when you add your content to Google+. Google+ hasn’t been translating URL shorteners well, so use a link from the source. This will not only allow Google to better populate the content as you see above, including the Title, Blog Name, Description, and an Image from the post, but it will also allow that content to be cross-referenced to any Google +1 “likes” from others within Google+ and the rest of the Googlephere. Site URLs are translated the way they are on Facebook. You need to paste the URL into the “Share what’s new…” text box.
  • Prefixing names with a plus sign links that name to the person’s profile on Google+. You can include your friends and people you’re connected to on G+ in a similar way you do in Facebook, but Google+ has a gimmick that you may know or not. In the graphic above, you’ll see a light gray-blue rectangular box around the names Arsh S and Jenna Levy — I did that by adding a plus symbol (+) before each name while I am writing the article. G+ then populates a pull-down, offering pre-populated names of people I am connected to. I just need to select and go. Sometimes the profile’s privacy setting prohibits the link reference to persist after posting. Linking to people is a good way to engage, inform, and initiate conversation.

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August 9, 2011

The big secret to getting people to read your blog

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3108/3150724610_e2b0f585e3_m.jpgChris AbrahamLong blog post short: please be as descriptive as possible when titling your blog posts. In today’s decontextualized world of walls, feeds, RSS, e-mail, diggs, reddits, Stumbles, tweets, and retweets, you need to attract your potential reader based only on the appeal of your title and nothing else, especially if you’re new to blogging and don’t happen to be Seth Godin.

Use up to the 70 characters that Google indexes for each post title but make sure the most important message of the title are nearer the beginning of the title. Don’t bury the lead in the post and don’t bury the lead in the title, either.

Tweetmeme and other sharing services chop off long titles, so while you can go long, keep your essentials right at the beginning.

A good title is a good habit — here’s why

Recently I wrote the post Blog so you can be taken completely out of context in which I discussed how essential it is to make sure each blog post you write needs to be completely self-contained and self-referential. Looking back, I notice I missed the most important part of every blog post: the blog title.

In 2011, with Twitter, Facebook, Google+, retweets, sharing, and RSS via Google Reader, all anyone ever sees is the title of whatever’s shared, especially if you’re not Beth Kanter, Kami Huyse, Seth Godin, CC Chapman, Shel Israel, Geoff Livingston, Richard Laermer, Olivier Blanchard, Christopher Penn, Chris Brogan or Brian Solis. If you’re one of these bloggers, your title is a little less important; however, your name may well be stripped by the confines of a 140-character world, so a good title is a good habit even for our hallowed celebrities since their personal brand doesn’t always move as fast as the share. Continue reading