June 18, 2014

11 steps to creating truly awful content

If you can’t be the best, why not be the worst?

Target audience: PR professionals, marketers, content creators, brand journalists, communicators.

David SparkWouldn’t it be great if someone could simply explain to you the secret to creating great content? Maybe they could walk you through it with just a dozen steps. Thousands of people like you will gravitate toward such an article. It could be called “How to Create Great Content” and you can cross your fingers that it doesn’t include the same redundant advice (e.g., “Create something interesting that would be of value to your audience”).

BadEgg300Have you noticed that these “How to Create Great Content” articles are written by the dozens if not hundreds. They’re all useless. In fact, I wrote an article on just that sad reality (READ: “Why I’m Annoyed By All ‘How to Create Great Content’ Advice”).

The only way to create great content is to do it over and over again until you get good at it. And then once you’re good at it, keep doing it until you’re better at it. Continue reading

July 29, 2011

12 tips on how to approach bloggers

 

David SparkOn July 27 I attended and moderated a panel at the PR Summit in San Francisco. This blog post is a report being submitted for Intertainment Media, makers of the desktop communications and content app KNCTR and the real-time chat translation tool Ortsbo.

Pestering bloggers. It’s a PR rep’s time-honored tradition. A client has something to announce or show off, and PR reps go out of their way to get the attention of bloggers. But what’s the best way to approach them?

At the PR Summit in San Francisco, four bloggers and I tried to answer that very question:

  • Ryan Singel (Wired.com)
  • Jolie O’Dell (Venturebeat)
  • Beth Spotswood (SFGate, Huffington Post, and CBS)
  • Michael Leifer (Guerilla PR)

12 recommendations on the best way to engage bloggers

Here are 12 tips and arguments that came up in the discussion on how to approach bloggers:

1. Keep it short and sweet. Far too many email pitches have endless copy. Ryan Singel was really impressed with a particular five-line pitch. It’s OK if you have more information. Just send it once the blogger expresses interest. Continue reading