August 11, 2014

Top takeaways from a growth hacking conference

Rand-Fishkin
Rand Fishkin, founder of Moz, speaking at the Weapons of Mass Distribution conference in San Francisco on Thursday.

Make sure your content is unique, relevant and looks great

Target audience: Marketing professionals, SEO specialists, entrepreneurs, PR pros, brand managers, businesses, nonprofits, educators, Web publishers, journalists.

JD LasicaToday, it seems, just about all startups — and even more mature companies — want to wield the growth hacking buzzsaw. Growth hacking was the theme that drew several hundred marketers, entrepreneurs and business strategists to the Hotel Kabuki in San Francisco on Thursday for the fancifully named Weapons of Mass Distribution conference put on by 500 Startups.

And while growth hacking may be hot hot hot right now — even marketing consultant Sean Ellis, who coined the term, was on hand — the impressive lineup of speakers made it clear that to succeed, a new enterprise can’t spin flax into gold. You’ve got to have some kick-ass idea to begin with, and you have to have a product team that knows how to execute. And then, yes, by all means, call in the growth hackers and marketers to run the numbers, size up your analytics, get feedback from customers, and create a virtuous product development loop that fast-tracks your company on to its inevitable trajectory of fame, riches and a guest spot on Jason Calacanis’s “This Week in Startups” podcast.

I captured some of the magic on stage and in the room in this Flickr photo set. (Ah, Flickr, you were on that fast track once!) Continue reading

April 24, 2014

Get creative by thinking outside the online box

baseball-players
When you sponsor youth sports, your business becomes the star of the team.

4 ways to promote your company — other than social media

Target audience: Marketing professionals, PR pros, SEO specialists, brand managers, businesses, nonprofits, educators, Web publishers.

Post by Andrew Lisa

Andrew-LisaSocial marketing through sites such as Twitter and Facebook is an essential part of modern business marketing strategy. But digital advertising and promotion isn’t the end of the road. Before the Internet, business owners had to be creative and think outside the box to make an impact with their publicity campaigns – and the smart ones still do.

Here are some tips to getting creative with marketing in ways that will have a big offline impact.

Continue reading

March 31, 2014

Data integration! Key for a successful marketing campaign

data-integration
Data integration is the key to a successful marketing campaign.

Are your organization’s departments all on the same page?

Target audience: Marketing professionals, SEO specialists, PR pros, brand managers, businesses, nonprofits, educators, Web publishers, journalists.

Post by Andrew Lisa

Andrew-LisaData integration is a concept that every smart business is familiar with, and for marketing professionals, identifying and unifying separate data entities is especially important. Follow this guide to understanding data integration for marketing professionals.

Marketing data can be spread across many departments in a given company. Huge data warehouses that aren’t linked create a situation where data is scattered across multiple channels. Data integration is needed to provide a common pathway between customer databases, customer relationship management systems, call centers, social marketing campaigns and point-of-sale systems. Continue reading

December 9, 2013

7 emerging social media marketing trends for 2014

pinterest-vine-gplus
Pinterest, Vine and Google Plus: three of the sites to keep an eye on in 2014.

Predictions to help businesses stay ahead of the curve

Guest post by Nikhil Jain

Target audience: Marketing professionals, SEO specialists, PR pros, brand managers, businesses, nonprofits, educators, Web publishers, journalists.

nikhil-jainWith 2014 knocking on the door, we thought it was time to put down the eggnog and take a hard look at what’s going to be hot on the social media marketing front the coming year — and what won’t be hot.

Before we do, let’s take a quick look at a roundup of trends that have originated from the most popular social networks this year. Continue reading

April 25, 2013

In praise of social media perseverence

rsz_goodenough

With social marketing, showing up is half the battle

Chris AbrahamMy advice for blogging and social media marketing alike is as follows: 20 minutes a day — and one hour once a week. If you spend any less time than that, you’re really not a content marketer. However, spending this amount of time on social media brand promotion and protection is really just barely enough time to keep things moving forward.

It’s yeoman’s work and you’ll never win any awards for doing the bare minimum, but if you can keep showing up every work day and then spend an extra hour once a week, and you can do that persistently and consistently over time, you’ll start seeing some impressive results.

Social media rewards consistency, persistence, and attention, even if it isn’t super-service or if you take a full 24 hours to respond to a customer’s query or constituent’s concern.

Come on, you’re not @AmericanAir, and you don’t need to be. My flight was grounded en route to SXSW, I tweeted complaint, and AA got back to me on Twitter by the time I deplaned — you probably don’t need to offer that much service, do you? Continue reading

March 20, 2013

When a crisis hits, how graceful is your response?

crisis management
Photo courtesy of Kid Gibson (Creative Commons)

After things go wrong, authenticity can set it right

Chris AbrahamSomething’s always going to go wrong. Murphy’s law demands it. It is your mandatory tithe to the universe. This is true about everything.

Perhaps character is what shows when things go wrong, and it’s what you do when things don’t go right that defines you. It’s never the end of the world. In fact, sometimes really messing up can initiate a valuable interaction that wouldn’t have ever happened were the mistake avoided. You’ll always be remembered more for how you handle something than for what you did in the first place.  Continue reading