December 4, 2013

SEO? Start by adding value to your website


Quenching Google’s informational thirst will pay off for your business

Target audience: Marketing professionals, SEO specialists, PR pros, brand managers, businesses, nonprofits, educators, Web publishers, journalists.

Chris AbrahamImet my buddy Adam Viener for breakfast the other morning at the Silver Diner in Reston, Va. This is something we do seasonally. Adam is an AdWords guru, par excellence, by profession; however, he also stays on top of organic search religiously just as part of creating content sublime enough to compel all the folks who click through from sponsored search, contextual ads, and display ads.

I asked him what he thought of Hummingbird, Google’s latest search algorithm, and he said: “Aside from just making sure you have all of the share and +1 buttons sorted out on your sites and committing to Google Authorship, the only thing that’s left is simple: creating content that gives value to Google.” Continue reading

November 12, 2013

Google Hummingbird tries to remove the masks

Image by Frank Kovalchek on Flickr

This is the second of a two-part series on Google Hummingbird. Also see:
Google demands your papers with Hummingbird

Target audience: Marketing professionals, SEO specialists, PR pros, brand managers, businesses, educators, Web publishers, journalists.

Chris AbrahamIam back in the dating pool and have really enjoyed hearing everyone’s war stories. They’re, of course, first-world-problems; and, most of them feel like they’re torn directly from romcoms and sitcoms: “he was a decade older than his photo” and “he looked nothing like his photo” or “he was nothing like the way he described himself,” and “I really felt like I was bait-and-switched” and even, “if he thought he could lure me here under false pretenses and then make it all good on charm and personality, it didn’t work: he was charmless and lacked personality.”

Google feels the same way.

But because Google was built by an army of earnest, hopeful, and lonely nerds, it has taken over five years for Google to get a clue. Continue reading