October 23, 2012

Why Google Authorship matters to your business


Three of the authors on Socialbrite appearing in Google search results.

Lay claim to your own content with rel-author

This is the second of a two-part series. Also see:
A visual guide to rich snippets [Infographic]

Target audience: Businesses, Web publishers, nonprofits, entrepreneurs, Web publishers, educators, journalists — anyone with a website.

JD LasicaIf you create content on the Web — and if you’re trying to get people to find your business or nonprofit online, you should be creating content — then your biggest challenge is to have people find you in search. And, let’s get super obvious here: That means you want them to literally click your link and get to your site, right?

Now, the first challenge to overcome is show up on the first page of Google search results, given that about 97 percent of people never click through to the second page of results. (To dig deeper into search engine optimization for your site, see our articles on SEO.) Continue reading

November 16, 2011

Set up your Google+ brand page the right way

Chris AbrahamLast week, I wrote Max SEO with 8 simple Google+ steps  before Google opened up G+ Brand Pages, so first go read what I wrote in the previous post (because all of the advice still applies). In this post, we’ll work on setting up your brand page right away in the right way. If you follow these steps, you’ll be as well-placed as possible.

First, did you notice that there’s a new button on your Google+ profile? Go ahead and click “Create a Google+ page” and we’ll get started.

Your first option is to create a page. Be careful here, because it isn’t simple to change the sort of page you have. Continue reading

November 9, 2011

Max SEO with 8 simple Google+ steps

Chris AbrahamLet me boil my last post, Here’s why it make sense to use Google Plus, down to practical pieces. Part of what makes a technology premature is that you have to be careful how you use it, because it isn’t mature enough to just work no matter what you do with it. To help you carefully handle Google+ for maximum advantage, I’ve assembled eight steps that help you get the best search visibility from your Google+ posts. These tips are simple, but some are easy to overlook. I hacked this awful-looking graphic as an example:

Optimizing Google+ for optimal SEO

Here’s a list of things that you need to consider before you invest your time and energy in Google+:

  • Make sure all your posts are Public. You can add more circles in order to spur interest among your friends, but be sure you explicitly tell Google, through your willingness to share publicly, that they can index your content in their public search engine. Check this every time because sometimes Public isn’t always selected, depending on the situation. Here’s my Google+ public profile.
  • Use a clean URL when you add your content to Google+. Google+ hasn’t been translating URL shorteners well, so use a link from the source. This will not only allow Google to better populate the content as you see above, including the Title, Blog Name, Description, and an Image from the post, but it will also allow that content to be cross-referenced to any Google +1 “likes” from others within Google+ and the rest of the Googlephere. Site URLs are translated the way they are on Facebook. You need to paste the URL into the “Share what’s new…” text box.
  • Prefixing names with a plus sign links that name to the person’s profile on Google+. You can include your friends and people you’re connected to on G+ in a similar way you do in Facebook, but Google+ has a gimmick that you may know or not. In the graphic above, you’ll see a light gray-blue rectangular box around the names Arsh S and Jenna Levy — I did that by adding a plus symbol (+) before each name while I am writing the article. G+ then populates a pull-down, offering pre-populated names of people I am connected to. I just need to select and go. Sometimes the profile’s privacy setting prohibits the link reference to persist after posting. Linking to people is a good way to engage, inform, and initiate conversation.

Continue reading