September 26, 2013

7 strategies for succeeding in the new Google Search

search
Image by Fairfax County on Flickr

Changes in search results require changes in content & marketing strategies

This is the second of a two-part series on Google Search. Also see:
Content strategies to deal with Google Panda & Google Penguin

Target audience: Marketing professionals, SEO specialists, PR professionals, mobile strategists, businesses, nonprofits, Google Plus users.

Chris AbrahamAcouple years ago, search engine optimization (SEO) held a lot of secrets. But that’s not quite as true today.

To a large extent, SEO today has become a war between Google’s vision of what quality and valuable search results should look like — and the rewards conferred to anyone who can just produce content that meets those stringent standards — and an entire industry that is committed to finding every shortcut and loophole possible and systematically exploiting those loopholes for as long as possible until they’re closed. The entire SEO industry has been almost entirely fueled by exploiting shortcuts, loopholes, link syndicates, link conspiracies, strategic linking, shadow linking, and shadow content. And it’s mostly worked, too, until recently. Until Google really started rolling out Panda and Penguin algorithms, as I wrote about Monday. Continue reading

February 25, 2013

The power of content marketing for business

ValuableContent
Image by 10ch (Creative Commons)

Valuable content gives companies a leg up on the competition

Target audience: Marketing professionals, SEO specialists, businesses, brands, Web publishers.

FM_Valuable_Content_Marketing_234x156 v5.inddEditor’s note: Quality content has always been a hallmark of quality websites. In “Valuable Content Marketing,” a new book by Sonja Jefferson and Sharon Tanton, the authors provide a deep dive into content marketing to explain how businesses can create high-quality content that targets your customer base and elevates your site’s ranking in search engine results. Here’s an excerpt from their book.

Guest post by Sonja Jefferson and Sharon Tanton

With potential customers being inundated with companies’ marketing efforts, standard marketing practices and mediocre content is quickly dismissed by most audiences; buyers no longer tolerate or respond to marketing that is less than good. To stand out, content should be truly valuable, providing a unique, educational, and perhaps even inspirational element to readers. In short, it should be content they appreciate — content that is generously shared and willingly received. Continue reading

November 28, 2012

Lean content marketing: How to do it right


Leo Widrich, co-founder of Buffer, at last night’s Lean content marketing event (photo by JD Lasica).

5 rules for creating content with social appeal

Target audience: Content marketers, agencies, marketing professionals, businesses, brands, start-ups, nonprofits, social enterprises, educators, journalists.

JD LasicaLast night I attended the first Lean Content Marketing meeup put on by Scoop.it, the content curation platform, at their San Francisco headquarters. About 80 folks, a mix of marketers and entrepreneurs, turned out to hear Leo Widrich, CEO and co-founder of Buffer, offer his five cardinal rules of content marketing.

Content marketing, which my partner David Spark prefers to call brand journalism, is the practice of creating content relevant to your brand to gain greater visibiilty in search results and in social channels. Simply put, if you don’t create content, you can’t be an influencer, and you won’t get people talking about your company, product or service.

Where does lean content marketing come in? We’re a stone’s throw from Silicon Valley, where the conventional wisdom holds that a company that’s lean and product-focused will out-perform one that’s too marketing-centric, Scoop.it’s Arabella Santiago explained. Thus, like lean startup culture, the marketing sector could learn a few things from smaller, nimble means of spreading the word about a great new product — with social media at the top of the list. Blasting out a brand message doesn’t work if the underlying claim or value proposition is bupkis. Continue reading