July 7, 2014

With their content drowning in a sea of social media, brands should look to their users for the rescue

mobilizr

New startup allows brands to reward loyal users for engagement

Ayelet NoffEvery brand on social media wants to find the best way to engage with consumers. But the reality is that with social media constantly evolving it is becoming more and more difficult.

A good example of the effect of the recent changes in social platforms is the Snickers World Cup campaign. Snickers published a photo on Facebook and Twitter simultaneously during a recent World Cup match. While the Twitter photo “blew up” with retweets and comments, the Facebook post generated very low traction again, suggesting that organic reach on Facebook is practically dead. Continue reading

March 26, 2014

Why promoting a brand takes perseverance

persistence

Target audience: Marketing professionals, PR pros, brand managers, SEO specialists, businesses.

Chris AbrahamIf you want to be heard above the din of the Internet, you need to speak clearly and with persistence. It’s not uncommon for someone at a loud bar not to hear you the first time, or even twice. If you assume someone isn’t interested in getting to know you better just because they don’t hear you the first or second time, then you’re doomed. The Internet is the busiest, loudest, most distracting place ever created. It’s global and impersonal and often anonymous. Plus, there’s no accountability.

At least in a bar, you can sit right next to the someone you want to meet and then just bide your time until there’s a lull in the noise or you can catch an eye. The Internet’s just not like that. Social media is loud and tends to be an insider’s club. We resonate with people we already know, be it in our in-boxes, our rivers of news, or our walls, we tend to tune out unknowns. And, in social media marketing, most of us are unknowns, most brands are unknown, and most services, too. Continue reading

September 24, 2012

Win the online reputation land war

Online reputation management tries to replace negative results with positive & neutral entries

Chris AbrahamWhile I concur with Vizzini, the Sicilian from the movie The Princess Bride, that one should “never get involved in a land war in Asia,” sometimes there’s no escape — and taking on Google’s search index, algorithmic prowess, and the natural results of organic search itself is, indeed, akin to getting involved in a land war in Asia. Most folks know only of the fierce fighting associated with organic search engine optimization (SEO), a process by which we write copy, optimize architecture, use keywords, add hyperlinks, and interlink sites in order to associate a keyword phrase with our particular brand, product, service, and site; another, larger battle is online reputation management, or ORM. Continue reading