January 23, 2014

What the first ever Google Glass-powered interview says about the future of tech

Ayelet NoffThe most exciting aspect about tech, for me at least, is the exponential nature of technological change. We can see this in the big tech changes of the past 100 years. A century ago, the big technological change came from the invention of cars and planes, 70 years ago it was TV, 40 years ago the personal computer. Now, the pace of technological change is so fast that major new inventions are unveiled practically every day.

Donning Google’s cutting-edge wearable headset to film both participants’ eye-level views of a tech conversation

In fact, just a few days ago I was able to take part in a first-of-its-kind technological experiment. My good friend Enon Landenberg, the CEO of Infinity AR, invited me to participate in the first-ever Glass-to-Glass interview. The idea was that we would don Google’s cutting-edge wearable headset and use it to film both of our eye-level views of a tech conversation.

Continue reading

October 26, 2009

Xsights’ new iPhone app brings print to life

Ayelet NoffXsights is a new start-up that has just come out with its Light app for the iPhone, which enables its users to bring print to life. Xsights makes it possible to transform static printed items that can be captured through the cell phone’s camera into an interactive multimedia experience. (Disclosure: Xsights is a Blonde 2.0 client)
Continue reading

August 1, 2009

Is the Internet making us more ethical?

Ethics of cultural collaboration from JD Lasica on Vimeo.

JD LasicaRita J. King, a senior fellow at the Carnegie Council and CEO of Dancing Ink Productions, talks about the ethics of cultural collaboration in this 10-minute video interview immediately after her appearance at the 140 Character Conference on Twitter in New York on June 17.

twitter-greenOur conversation was generally at a 50,000-foot level, looking at the Internet and its role in the development of an ethical culture. Rita uses the model of a Johari window, a square divided into four parts: How I see myself accurately; how I see myself inaccurately; how others see me accurately; and how others see me inaccurately. Participating in the digital culture shakes all those things up, she says, and new technologies are enabling people are able to parse out how they feel about the rituals and traditions that have been passed down from generation to generation “which both illuminate the human spirit and shackle us to outdated systems.”

During the panel and in our conversation, Rita questioned whether the efforts in the West to help the street demonstrators are helping or hurting if the tactics are based on deception, such as changing one’s Twitter profile to say you live in Tehran as an expression of solidarity. “Is it putting people on the ground in Tehran in jeopardy if they can’t find each other? Deliberate deception seems like a step backward to me. … And that’s symptomatic of other things that will continue to manifest in the digital culture,” with a debate over how best to achieve a social good.

Continue reading